Woodstock Brewery repurposed as a soup kitchen for needy communities in lockdown

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Cape Town – Woodstock Brewery has modified its traditional restaurant and brewery to now serve needy communities in the area.

André Viljoen, owner of the brewery, said the site had been repurposed and now served as a soup kitchen using their brewing equipment, preparing 15000 to 20000 meals, six days a week.

“We’ve been going about three weeks now, using creative distribution systems to deliver bread and a full meal,” he said. “We’re cooking one to two shifts, six days a week.”

Needy areas which have been identified so far are communities in Khayelitsha, Nyanga, Gugulethu, Philippi and Delft.

“We serve all communities that have contacted us to the best of our ability, with ideal distribution taking place in 1000-litre flow bins to soup kitchens across the greater Cape Town area.”

About 800 litres of food is prepared at a time.

“It’s about feeding people who have no money because the economy is on the verge of breaking, and keeping business relationships working in the whole country.

“The soup kitchen helps us get large amounts of food to the hungry. It’s easy to fund through large donations from many friends on our social media and in personal relationships.”

The owner Andre Viljoen had the idea to change the brewery to a soup kitchen in order to support those who are in need during the Covid-19 lockdown. Photographer: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)
Volunteers and staff members of the Woodstock Brewery in Woodstock prepare a vegetable soup using brewery tanks, that will be distributed to poor communities like Langa, Khayelitsha, Du Noon and other areas on the Cape Flats. Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)
Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)

Viljoen said they were working closely with the City’s Disaster Risk Management and other groups to help identify areas with the biggest need.

“We’re completing the pilot project and moving on to phase two, which will focus on higher volumes of production.”

Head chef Belle McLeod said: “I was put in contact with Andre before we went into lockdown. It was a short conversation, asking if about getting involved in the project. It was a yes.”

McLeod runs different kitchens around Cape Town.

“I found the whole experience humbling. I have moments not being able to fathom that this has always been here.

“This problem did not come with the pandemic. We need to start doing something for each other.”

Photographer: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)
Staff members of the Woodstock Brewery in Woodstock prepare a vegetable soup using brewery tanks, that will be distributed to poor communities like Langa, Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)
Photographer: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)
Photographer: Armand Hough/African News Agency(ANA)

Cape Argus

By Shakirah Thebus

Credit: www.iol.co.za

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